≡ MENU

Recommended Readings for Mental Health Professionals

One of the easiest ways to learn about new developments and polish your skills is to read some of the excellent books and articles that are available. Here you will find some of our recommendations. They should be available through libraries and bookstores and many can be ordered directly from the publisher.

We've included links for ordering books on-line through Amazon.com for your convenience. If you order through these links, there is no added cost to you but a small portion of your purchase goes to support this Web site. To order one of the recommended books on-line, simply click on the "Order This Book Now" link at the end of the book's listing.

Jump to a Specific Category:

General

There are many good readings which focus on specific topics and which are recommended under specific headings later on this page. The readings in this section provide a good general introduction to the theory and practice of Cognitive Therapy. They provide a good foundation for more specialized readings:

Beck, A. T., Rush, A. J., Shaw, B. & Emery, G. (1987). Cognitive Therapy of Depression. New York: Guilford Press. This classic work is considered by many to be the basic text in Cognitive Therapy. It covers both the theory and practice of Cognitive Therapy with a focus on the treatment of depression.
Order This Book Now »

Freeman, A., Pretzer, J., Fleming, B. & Simon, K. (2004). Clinical Applications of Cognitive Therapy, second edition. New York: Plenum Press. This comprehensive text covers the principles of Cognitive Therapy and their application with a broad range of problems including depression, suicidality, anxiety disorders, and personality disorders. It includes detailed case examples and clear illustrations of many intervention techniques.
Order This Book Now »

Beck, J. S. (2011). Cognitive Therapy: Basics and Beyond. New York: Guilford Press. A good introduction to the practice of Cognitive Therapy which includes a good discussion of methods for identifying and modifying dysfunctional schemas.
Order This Book Now »

Anthony, M. M., Ledley, D. R., and Heimberg, R. G. (2005). Improving Outcomes and Preventing Relapse in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. New York: Guilford.  A state-of-the-art summary of methods for intervening more effectively with eleven different disorders.  Highly recommended
Order Improving Outcomes and Preventing Relapses Now »

Bennet-Levy, J., Butler, G., Fennell, M., Hackman, A., Mueller, M., and Westbrook, D. (2004).  Behavioral Experiments in Cognitive Therapy.  New York: Oxford University Press. One of the best ways to increase the effectiveness of Cognitive Therapy is to increase the use of behavioral experiments. This detailed, practical guide is an excellent resource.
Order The Oxford Guide to Behavioral Experiments Now »

Greenberger, D. & Padesky C., (2015). Mind over Mood and Padesky, C. & Greenberger, D. (1995). Clinician's Guide to Mind Over Mood. New York: Guilford. This excellent manual for clients receiving Cognitive Therapy to use along with therapy and the accompanying guide for therapists provide a useful resource. Mind Over Mood provides clear explanations of depression, anxiety, anger, guilt, and other problems and includes many worksheets which help individuals put the principles into practice in real-life. The Clinician's Guide provides useful suggestions for using Mind Over Mood with a wide range of clients.
Order Mind Over Mood Now »
Order The Clinician's Guide Now »

Back to Top

Adolescents

The traditional assumption that adolescence is a universal time of turmoil and conflict may be a gross over-generalization, but it is true that adolescents have some unique characteristics which must be considered if one is to intervene effectively. A number of investigators have provided useful suggestions about applying Cognitive Therapy with this population:

Reinecke, M. A., Dattilio, F. M., & Freeman, A. (Eds.) (2003). Cognitive Therapy with Children and Adolescents, 2nd edition: A casebook for clinical practice. New York: Guilford Press. Useful examples of the application of a variety of cognitive-behavioral approaches with a variety of problems.
Order This Book Now »

Francis, G. & Beidel, D. (2004). Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy. In: T.L. Morris and J.S. March (Eds.) Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents, Second Edition. New York: Guilford Press. A good overview of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders in children and adolescents.
Order This Book Now »

Wilkes, T. C. R., Belsher, G. Rush, A. J., Frank, E. & Associates. (1994). Cognitive Therapy for Depressed Adolescents. New York: Guilford. A thorough exploration of the use of Cognitive Therapy in the treatment of depressed adolescents.
Order This Book Now »

Temple, S. (1997). Brief Therapy for Adolescent Depression. Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Press. Another good reading on CBT with adolescents, this is a concise, practical volume designed to be useful to practitioners. It covers both individual and family therapy and provides clear illustrations of the application of a broad range of intervention techniques.
Order This Book Now »

Schrodt, G. R., Jr. (1993). Adolescent inpatient treatment. In: J. H. Wright, M. E. Thase, A. T. Beck & J. W. Ludgate (Eds.) Cognitive Therapy with Inpatients: Developing a Cognitive Milieu. New York: Guilford. A good resource for those working in inpatient settings.
Order This Book Now »

Back to Top

Alcohol and Drug Problems

Once upon a time 12-step groups and 28-day inpatient programs were seen as the only treatment options for alcoholism and substance abuse. Since then much has been learned and an extensive body of research provides an excellent foundation for effective intervention with this wide-spread problem:

Miller, W.R. & Carroll, K.M. (2010). Rethinking Substance Abuse: What the Science Shows, and What We Should Do About It. New York: Guilford. This book explores what treatment and prevention of substance abuse would look like it if were based on the best science available.
Order this book now »

Beck, A. T., Wright, F. W., Newman, C. F. & Liese, B. S. (1993). Cognitive Therapy of Substance Abuse. New York: Guilford. An excellent presentation of a Cognitive view of substance abuse and the application of Cognitive Therapy with substance abuse problems.
Order This Book Now »

Miller, W. R., Rollnick, S., Conforti, K., and Miller, S. (2012). Motivational Interviewing: Preparing People to Change Addictive Behavior, third edition. New York: Guilford. Lack of motivation for change is one of the biggest problem in treating substance abuse. This volume presents a practical approach to generating motivation for change which has been supported by extensive research.
Order This Book Now »

Prochaska, J. O., DiClemente, C. C. & Norcross, J. C. (1992). In search of how people change: Applications to addictive behaviors. American Psychologist, 47, 1102-1114. An excellent overview of recent discoveries about the process of change which provide a basis for more effective intervention.

Marlatt, G. A. & Gordon, J. R. (2005). Relapse Prevention. New York: Guilford. One of the major problems in the treatment of substance abuse is the high rate of relapse. This book, based on extensive research into relapse, presents strategies for reducing the risk of relapse.
Order This Book Now »

Sharpe, L. & Tarrier, N. (1992). A cognitive-behavioral treatment approach for problem gambling. Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy: An International Quarterly, 6, 193-203. A promising approach to applying cognitive-behavioral therapy with this growing problem.

Wilson, G. T. (1987). Cognitive studies in alcoholism. Journal of Clinical and Consulting Psychology, 55, 325-331. A good summary of research about the role of cognition in substance abuse.

Back to Top

Anxiety

Cognitive-behavioral treatment approaches are quite effective with anxiety disorders. However, specialized knowledge and intervention techniques are needed for effective intervention and there have been major advances in the treatment of anxiety disorders over the past ten to fifteen years. These readings should provide a good introduction to this field:

Clark, D.A. & Beck, A.T. (2010). Cognitive Therapy of Anxiety Disorders: Science and Practice. New York: Guilford. This scholarly work discusses the reformulated cognitive model of anxiety and its empirical status, how the basic elements of cognitive therapy are used to alleviate anxiety, and presents disorder-specific adaptations of cognitive therapy.
Order This Book Now »

Beck, A. T. & Emery, G. with Greenberg, R. L. (2005). Anxiety Disorders and Phobias: A Cognitive Perspective [Deluxe Edition] New York: Basic. Cognitive Therapy can be quite effective with the full range of anxiety disorders but it needs to be applied a bit differently than it is when it is used as a treatment for depression. In particular, it is important to place an increased emphasis on in-vivo exposure and on eliminating avoidance behavior. This text provides an excellent introduction to Cognitive Therapy with the anxiety disorders.
Order This Book Now »

Michelson, L. & Ascher, L. M. (Eds.) (1987). Anxiety and Stress Disorders: Cognitive-behavioral Assessment and Treatment. New York: Guilford. This volume covers a wide range of topics including each of the anxiety disorders and a number of special populations including anxiety disorders in children, in the elderly, in the mentally retarded, and anxiety associated with chemotherapy.
Order This Book Now »

Don't Panic: Taking Control of Anxiety Attacks
(Wilson, 2009). This is a good book about panic attacks. It provides detailed discussions of panic attacks, related problems, and methods for dealing with panic attacks. If you want detailed explanations, try this book.
Order This Book Now >>

Barlow, D. H. & Cerny, J. A. (1988). The Psychological Treatment of Panic. New York: Guilford. Panic attacks and panic disorder can be treated quite effectively through cognitive-behavioral interventions but, in order to do so effectively, the therapist needs some specialized knowledge about panic attacks and intervention techniques. This treatment manual provides detailed instruction in Barlow's approach to treating panic.
Order This Book Now »

Beidel, D. C. & Turner, S. M. (2007). Shy Children, Phobic Adults: Nature and Treatment of Social Phobia. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association Press. This excellent volume describes the manifestations of social phobia across the life-span and describes effective approaches to treating social phobia both in children and in adults.
Order This Book Now »

Back to Top

Assertion

Assertion training has been an established intervention approach for decades. These readings provide a good overview of the field:

Alberti, R. E. & Emmons, M. L. (2017). Your Perfect Right: A Guide to Assertive Living. San Luis Obispo, CA: Impact Publishers.. Many people have a hard time speaking up for themselves, setting limits, and turning down requests. This classic book has been in use for nearly 30 years (with frequent updates) and it has been helpful to many people over the years.
Order this book now »

Rakos, R. F. (1990). Assertive Behavior: Theory, Research, and Training. New York: Routledge. This book provides a good summary of the extensive theoretical, empirical, and clinical literature on assertion.
Order This Book Now »

Back to Top

Children

Cognitive Therapy can work well with children, adolescents, and families but some adjustments are needed. First of all, we need to recognize that family intervention or a combination of family and individual intervention may be more appropriate than individual intervention. Then we need to make adjustments for the client's developmental level and adjust for differences in the client's issues and in the interpersonal context. Here are a number of good readings:

Reinecke, M. A., Dattilio, F. M., & Freeman, A. (Eds.) (2003). Cognitive therapy with children and adolescents, Second Edition: A casebook for clinical practice. New York: Guilford Press. Useful examples of the application of a variety of cognitive-behavioral approaches with a variety of problems.
Order This Book Now »

Francis, G. & Beidel, D. (2004). Cognitive-Behavioral Psychotherapy. In: J.S. March (Ed.) Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents, 2nd edition: New York: Guilford Press. A good overview of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety disorders in children.
Order This Book Now »

Knell, S. M. (1995). Cognitive-Behavioral Play Therapy. New York: Aronson. When using CBT with very young children we can't very well expect to sit and talk with them for an hour and then have them do written homework. We need to figure out how to communicate on a level that is appropriate to their developmental level and figure out how to intervene in ways which are likely to be effective. Obviously one option is to emphasize family intervention rather than individual therapy with the child. However, another option is to use play as a communication medium in working with young children. This excellent book provides clear examples of the use of play in CBT with young children.
Order This Book Now »

Beidel, D. C. & Turner, S. M. (2007). Shy Children, Phobic Adults: Nature and Treatment of Social Phobia. Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association Press. This excellent volume describes the manifestations of social phobia across the life-span and describes effective approaches to treating social phobia both in children and in adults.
Order This Book Now »

Reinecke, M. A. (1992). Childhood depression. In: A. Freeman & F. M. Dattilio (Eds.) Comprehensive Casebook of Cognitive Therapy. New York: Plenum. A good, general chapter on childhood depression.
Order This Book Now »

Deblinger, E., Lippmann, J., & Steer, R. (1996). Sexually abused children suffering post-traumatic stress symptoms: Initial treatment outcome findings. Child Maltreatment, 1(4), 310-321. An early study on treatment of PTSD in sexually abused children.

Back to Top

Chronic Pain

Many would assume that chronic pain is a medical problem and wonder why Cognitive therapists are involved with it at all. However, this is an area where cognitive-behavioral approaches have much to offer:

Martin, P. R. (1996). Psychological Management of Chronic Headaches. New York: Guilford. This book provides and excellent discussion about what is known about headaches, summarizes the empirical research on psychological interventions with headaches, and presents a comprehensive approach to managing chronic headaches. Two detailed case examples illustrate the approach.
Order This Book Now »

Miller, P. C. (1991). The application of cognitive therapy to chronic pain. In: T. M. Vallis, J. L. Howes & P. C. Miller (Eds.) The Challenge of Cognitive Therapy: Applications to Nontraditional Populations. New York: Plenum. A good chapter on treating chronic pain with cognitive-behavior therapy.
Order This Book Now »

Salkovskis, P. M. (1989). Somatic problems. In: K. Hawton, P. M. Salkovskis, J. Kirk & D. M. Clark (Eds.) Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Psychiatric Problems: A Practical Guide. New York: Oxford University Press. An excellent introduction to understanding and treating somatic problems from a cognitive-behavioral perspective.
Order This Book Now »

Back to Top

Cognitive Therapy

"The Clinical Practice of Cognitive Therapy" is a post-graduate training program for mental health professionals sponsored by the Cleveland Center for Cognitive Therapy (Educational Programs for Mental Health Professionals). The texts that we have selected provide a broad background in Cognitive Therapy with an emphasis on clinical practice:

Freeman, A., Pretzer, J., Fleming, B. & Simon, K. (2004). Clinical Applications of Cognitive Therapy, second edition. New York: Plenum Press. This volume provides an integrated approach to the application of Cognitive Therapy with a broad range of problems including depression, suicidality, anxiety disorders, and personality disorders. Clinical vignettes and verbatim transcripts provide clear illustrations of many intervention techniques.
Order This Book Now »

Greenberger, D. & Padesky C., (2015). Mind over Mood and Padesky, C. & Greenberger, D. (1995). Clinician's Guide to Mind Over Mood. New York: Guilford. This excellent manual for clients receiving Cognitive Therapy to use along with therapy and the accompanying guide for therapists provide a useful resource. Mind Over Mood provides clear explanations of depression, anxiety, anger, guilt, and other problems and includes many worksheets which help individuals put the principles into practice in real-life. The Clinician's Guide provides useful suggestions for using Mind Over Mood with a wide range of clients.
Order Mind Over Mood Now »
Order The Clinician's Guide Now »

Beck, A. T., Rush, A. J., Shaw, B. & Emery, G. (1987). Cognitive Therapy of Depression. New York: Guilford Press. This classic work is considered by many to be the basic text in Cognitive Therapy. It covers both the theory and practice of Cognitive Therapy with a focus on the treatment of depression.
Order This Book Now »

Beck, A. T., Davis, D. & Freeman, A. (2014). Cognitive Therapy of Personality Disorders, third edition. New York: Guilford Press. This collaborative work covers the application of Cognitive Therapy with the personality disorders.
Order This Book Now »

Kuyken, W., Padesky, C.A., & Dudley, R. (2008). Collaborative Case Conceptualization: Working Effectively with Clients in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy. New York: Guilford. Case conceptualization is a crucial, yet challenging aspect of Cognitive Therapy. This practical book brings the conceptualization process to life.
Order this book now »

Back to Top

Depression

Cognitive Therapy was originally developed as a treatment for depression and extensive research has demonstrated the efficacy Cognitive Therapy as a treatment for depression. Much has been written on Cognitive Therapy for depression. These volumes provide a good introduction:

Beck, A. T., Rush, A. J., Shaw, B. & Emery, G. (1987). Cognitive Therapy of Depression. New York: Guilford Press. This classic work is considered by many to be the basic text in Cognitive Therapy. It covers both the theory and practice of Cognitive Therapy with a focus on the treatment of depression.
Order This Book Now »

Wilkes, T. C. R., Belsher, G. Rush, A. J., Frank, E. & Associates. (1994). Cognitive Therapy for Depressed Adolescents. New York: Guilford. A thorough exploration of the use of Cognitive Therapy in the treatment of depressed adolescents.
Order This Book Now »

Temple, S. (1997). Brief Therapy for Adolescent Depression. Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Press. Another good reading on CBT with adolescents, this is a concise, practical volume designed to be useful to practitioners. It covers both individual and family therapy and provides clear illustrations of the application of a broad range of intervention techniques.
Order This Book Now »

Greenberger, D. & Padesky C., (2015). Mind over Mood and Padesky, C. & Greenberger, D. (1995). Clinician's Guide to Mind Over Mood. New York: Guilford. This excellent manual for clients receiving Cognitive Therapy to use along with therapy and the accompanying guide for therapists provide a useful resource. Mind Over Mood provides clear explanations of depression, anxiety, anger, guilt, and other problems and includes many worksheets which help individuals put the principles into practice in real-life. The Clinician's Guide provides useful suggestions for using Mind Over Mood with a wide range of clients.
Order Mind Over Mood Now »
Order The Clinician's Guide Now »

Burns, D. (1999). Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy. New York: Harper. This popular book is based on Cognitive Therapy's contemporary understanding of depression. it presents practical steps one can take to overcome depression. This book includes a wide range of possible interventions and can be a useful resource for therapists.
Order This Book Now »

Back to Top

Family of Origin Problems

Some would assume that family of origin issues are the domain of psychodynamic psychotherapy. However, Cognitive interventions can be used quite effectively, even with complex, long-standing problems:

Bedrosian, R. C. & Bozicas, G. D. (1994). Treating Family of Origin Problems: A Cognitive Approach. New York: Guilford. This excellent, practical volume presents a Cognitive perspective on family of origin problems and many good examples of how these issues can be addressed in Cognitive Therapy. I recommend it highly.
Order This Book Now »

Back to Top

Hoarding

Skeketee, G. and Frost, R.O. (2013). Treatment for Hoarding Disorder: Therapist Guide. Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. A cognitive-behaviorally based treatment manual. There is also a companion patient workbook.
Order This Book Now »

Back to Top

Marital and Family Problems

Cognitive therapy was developed originally as an approach to individual psychotherapy. However, the Cognitive approach can be used effectively with couples and families as well:

Beck, A. T. (1989). Love Is Never Enough . Aaron Beck, MD, the originator of Cognitive Therapy has been cited by American Psychologist as one of the most influential psychotherapists alive today. In this volume he presents his perspective on how couples can overcome misunderstandings, resolve conflicts, and solve relationship problems. The book is written at a level which is appropriate both for professionals and for well-educated clients.
Order This Book Now »

Baucom, D.H., Snyder, D.K., & Gordon, K.C. (2011). Helping Couples Get Past the Affair: A Clinician's Guide. New York: Guilford Press. Leading marital therapists and researchers present a three-stage therapy approach for couples who have experienced infidelity. Can be used in conjunction with the related self-help book Getting Past the Affair.
Order This Book Now »

Spring, J. A. With Spring, M. (1997). After the Affair . New York: Harper Collins. Infidelity can be a deathblow for a relationship or it can be a wake-up call challenging couples to build a healthier, stronger relationship. Here, an experienced therapist explores the many issues that an affair raises and presents concrete strategies and techniques for coping with the aftermath of an affair.
Order This Book Now »

Spring, J.A. (2005). How Can I Forgive You? The Courage to Forgive, The Freedom Not To. New York: Harper. This author presents a powerful and unconventional model for genuine forgiveness. This book can be useful for professionals as well as clients.
Order this book now »

Burns, D. (1999). The Feeling Good Handbook. New York: Plume. In this popular book, Burns puts the basic principles of his earlier book Feeling Good into a workbook format and covers a wider range of problems including procrastination, anxiety, and relationship problems.
Order This Book Now »

Dattilio, & Padesky, C. A. (1990). Cognitive Therapy with Couples. Sarasota, FL: Professional Resource Exchange. A concise, practical manual on Cognitive Therapy with couples.
Order This Book Now »

Epstein, N., Schlesinger, S. E. & Dryden, W. (1988). Cognitive-behavioral Therapy with Families. New York: Brunner/Mazel. Cognitive Therapy can work well with families but, thus far, little has been published about using CT with the family. This is the best resource I am aware of.
Order This Book Now »

Epstein, N. B. and Baucom, D. H. (2002). Enhanced Cognitive-Behavioral  Therapy for Couples: A Contextual Approach. Washington DC: American Psychological Association. This excellent volume presents the state-of-the-art in research and practice of Cognitive Therapy with couples.
Order This Book Now »

Back to Top

Older Adults

Cognitive Therapy has been tested as a treatment for depression and other problems in older adults and can be used quite effectively. A few good references include:

Thompson, L. W., Florsheim, M., DelMaestro, S., Gantz, F., Gallagher-Thompson, D. & Bryan, H. (1991). Cognitive behavioral therapy for affective disorders in the elderly. In: W. Myers (Ed.), New Techniques in the Psychotherapy of Older Patients. (pp. 3-19). Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association Press. Cognitive Therapy for depression is just as effective with older adults as it is with younger clients. This chapter focuses on applying CT with older adults.
Order This Book Now »

Thompson, L. W., Davies, R., Gallagher, D. & Krantz, S. (1986). Cognitive therapy with older adults. Clinical Gerontologist, 5, 245-279. One of the earliest articles on cognitive-behavior therapy with older adults.

Gallagher-Thompson, D. & Thompson, L. W. (1992). The older adult. In: A. Freeman & F. M. Dattilio (Eds.) Comprehensive Casebook of Cognitive Therapy. New York: Plenum. A good case example of Cognitive Therapy with older adults.
Order This Book Now »

Gantz, F. E., Gallagher-Thompson, D. & Rodman, J. (1992). Inhibited grief. In: A. Freeman & F. M. Dattilio (Eds.) Comprehensive Casebook of Cognitive Therapy. New York: Plenum. While problems with grief can occur at any age, this is a common problem among older clients. This article provides a good case example of the application of Cognitive Therapy with inhibited grief.
Order This Book Now »

Casey, D. A. & Grant, R. W. (1993). Cognitive therapy with depressed elderly inpatients. In: J. H. Wright, M. E. Thase, A. T. Beck & J. W. Ludgate (Eds.) Cognitive Therapy with Inpatients: Developing a Cognitive Milieu. New York: Guilford. A good resource for those working in inpatient settings.
Order This Book Now »

Back to Top

Personality Disorders

For many years it was assumed that psychodynamic psychotherapy was the treatment of choice for individuals diagnosed as having personality disorders. However, in recent years, cognitive-behavioral approaches to the treatment of individuals with these complex problems have developed rapidly. A growing body of empirical support leads some of us to conclude that cognitive-behavioral treatment for these debilitating problems may prove to be a major advance:

Perris, C. & McGorry, P. D. (Eds.) (1999) Cognitive Psychotherapy of Psychotic and Personality Disorders. John Wiley & Sons. (from the back cover) "This volume represents an authoritative survey of knowledge and practice by the leading research and clinical workers in this field of cognitive psychotherapy. Over recent years an impressive amount of research and clinical evidence has supported the effectiveness of cognitive therapy and related treatment approaches, sometimes in conjunction with a new generation of antipsychotic and antidepressant drugs with better efficacy and lower side effects. (I may be biased since this book includes chapter I wrote on CBT with personality disorders, but it looks quite good.)
Order This Book Now »

Pretzer, J. L. & Beck, A. T. (2004). A Cognitive Theory of Personality Disorders. In M. F. Lenzenweger and J. F. Clarkin (Eds.) Major Theories of Personality Disorder, second edition. New York: Guilford Press. A detailed theoretical discussion of Cognitive Therapy's current perspective on personality disorders. Since this volume also presents other contemporary perspectives on personality disorders, it provides a good opportunity to compare the different approaches.
Order This Book Now »

Beck, A. T., Davis, D. & Freeman, A. (2014). Cognitive Therapy of Personality Disorders, third edition. New York: Guilford Press. This volume is intended for therapists who already are familiar with Cognitive Therapy for Axis I disorders. It focuses specifically on applying Cognitive Therapy with personality disorders without covering the basic principles of Cognitive Therapy.
Order This Book Now »

Freeman, A., Pretzer, J., Fleming, B. & Simon, K. (2004). Clinical Applications of Cognitive Therapy, second edition. New York: Plenum Press. This book is appropriate both for therapists who are new to Cognitive Therapy and experienced Cognitive therapists. It covers the basic principles of Cognitive Therapy and the use of Cognitive Therapy with Axis I problems including depression, suicidality, and anxiety disorders. It then provides detailed coverage of the application of Cognitive Therapy with each of the major personality disorders.
Order This Book Now »

Layden, M. A., Newman, C. F., Freeman, A. & Morse, S. B. (2002). Cognitive Therapy of Borderline Personality Disorder. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon. Borderline personality disorder is a complex problem which can be difficult for therapists to understand and to treat effectively. This volume provides a detailed discussion of how to used Cognitive Therapy effectively with individuals diagnosed as having borderline personality disorder.
Order This Book Now »

Back to Top

Psychosis

Until recently many therapists presumed that anti-psychotic medication was the only effective treatment for psychosis. However, in recent years it has become clear that cognitive-behavioral therapy (in combination with appropriate medication) can be quite useful with this population:

Wright, J.H., Turkington, D., Kingdon, D.G., & Basco, M.R. (2009). Cognitive-Behavior Therapy for Severe Mental Illness. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Publishing. This book does an excellent job of explaining how to modify cognitive-behavior therapy for use with serious mental illness.
Order This Book Now »

Perris, C. & McGorry, P. D. (Eds.) (1999) Cognitive Psychotherapy of Psychotic and Personality Disorders. John Wiley & Sons. (from the back cover) "This volume represents an authoritative survey of knowledge and practice by the leading research and clinical workers in this field of cognitive psychotherapy. Over recent years an impressive amount of research and clinical evidence has supported the effectiveness of cognitive therapy and related treatment approaches, sometimes in conjunction with a new generation of anti-psychotic and antidepressant drugs with better efficacy and lower side effects." (I may be biased since this book includes a chapter I wrote on CBT with personality disorders, but it looks quite good.)
Order This Book Now »

Kingdon, D. G. & Turkington D. (2002). Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy of Schizophrenia. New York: Guilford Press. A widely-recommended text that covers both a cognitive-behavioral understanding of schizophrenia and a series of detailed case examples that illustrate the process of CBT with schizophrenia.
Order This Book Now »

Perris, C. (1989). Cognitive Therapy With Schizophrenic Patients. New York: Guilford Press. This excellent book presents a cognitive-behavioral understanding of schizophrenia and describes a comprehensive treatment program which includes individual Cognitive Therapy, milieu therapy, and other interventions in small residential settings.
Order This Book Now »

Back to Top

Relapse Prevention

The idea of working explicitly on Relapse Prevention emerged from research on substance abuse but relapse can be a problem in treating many other problems. These works provide valuable suggestions about preventing relapse with a broad range of problems:

Marlatt, G. A. & Gordon, J. R. (2005). Relapse Prevention, 2nd edition. New York: Guilford. One of the major problems in the treatment of substance abuse is the high rate of relapse. This book, based on extensive research into relapse, presents strategies for reducing the risk of relapse.
Order This Book Now »

Ludgate, J. W. (1995). Maximizing psychotherapeutic gains and preventing relapse in emotionally distressed clients. Sarasota, FL: Professional Resources Press. A good book on maintaining gains achieved in therapy.
Order This Book Now »

Wilson, P. H. (Ed.) (1992). Principles and Practice of Relapse Prevention. New York: Guilford. This promising book includes chapters on relapse prevention with problems ranging from depression and anxiety disorders to schizophrenia and sexual deviance.
Order This Book Now »

Back to Top

Trauma, PTSD and Victimization

Unfortunately, the effects of trauma and victimization are much more widespread than was previously recognized. Much is being learned about the effects of trauma and victimization and about effective intervention:

Follette, V. M., Ruzek, J. I., & Abueg, F. R. (Eds.) (2006). Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies for Trauma, Second Edition. New York: Guilford. Here's a promising book on CBT with trauma, PTSD, re-victimization, trauma-related guilt, etc.
Order This Book Now »

Meichenbaum, D. (2003). A Clinical Handbook/Practical Therapist Manual for assessing and treating adults with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Waterloo, Ontario: Institute Press. Meichenbaum's manual on treating PTSD comes highly recommended as a very useful text.
Order This BooK Now »

Resick, P. A., & Schnicke, M. K. (1992). Cognitive processing therapy for sexual assault victims. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 60(5),748-756. Cognitive-behavior therapy is now widely used in a variety of settings with people who have experienced trauma.

Kubany, E. S., & Manke, F. P. (1995). Cognitive therapy for trauma-related guilt: Conceptual bases and treatment outlines. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 2, 27-61. Aside from PTSD, guilt is a common problem with people who have experienced trauma.

Deblinger, E., Lippmann, J., & Steer, R. (1996). Sexually abused children suffering post-traumatic stress symptoms: Initial treatment outcome findings. Child Maltreatment, 1(4), 310-321. An early study on treatment of PTSD in sexually abused children.

Back to Top

Weight Loss

Beck, J.S. (2009). The Beck Diet Solution: Train your Brain to Think like a Thin Person. Birmingham, AL: Oxmoor. This book teaches dieters to apply the benefits of Cognitive Therapy to dieting and weight loss in a six-week program. This book can be useful for professionals as well as clients.
Order this book now »

Back to Top

24400 Highpoint Road, Suite 9   |   Beachwood, Ohio 44122   |   Phone: (216) 831-2500   |   Fax: (216) 831-4035

26777 Lorain Road, Suite 414   |   North Olmsted, Ohio 44070   |   Phone: (216) 831-2500   |   Fax: (216) 831-4035

All Rights Reserved 2017, Behavioral Health Associates, Inc. - Admin Login   |   Cleveland Web Design by Alt Media Studios